wo bist du


A 5th-century Greek lekythos, or olive oil jar, at the Cleveland Museum of Art is adorned with an image of Atalanta, a mythical virgin who said she would marry the man who could outrun her.

Cleveland Museum of Art View Larger

A 5th-century Greek lekythos, or olive oil jar, at the Cleveland Museum of Art is adorned with an image of Atalanta, a mythical virgin who said she would marry the man who could outrun her.

Cleveland Museum of Art


Elizabeth Bishop, “One Art”

The art of losing isn’t hard to master;

so many things seem filled with the intent
to be lost that their loss is no disaster.

Lose something every day. Accept the fluster
of lost door keys, the hour badly spent.
The art of losing isn’t hard to master.

Then practice losing farther, losing faster:
places, and names, and where it was you meant
to travel. None of these will bring disaster.

I lost my mother’s watch. And look! my last, or
next-to-last, of three loved houses went.
The art of losing isn’t hard to master.

I lost two cities, lovely ones. And, vaster,
some realms I owned, two rivers, a continent.
I miss them, but it wasn’t a disaster.

—Even losing you (the joking voice, a gesture
I love) I shan’t have lied. It’s evident
the art of losing’s not too hard to master
though it may look like (Write it!) like disaster.

René Magritte (Belgian, 1898-1967), Les Muscles célestes (The Muscles of the Sky), Paris, 1927. Oil on canvas, 21 1/4 x 28 3/4″ (54 x 73 cm), Deposited with the Magritte Museum, Brussels.
Now on view at the MoMA. View Larger

René Magritte (Belgian, 1898-1967), Les Muscles célestes (The Muscles of the Sky), Paris, 1927. Oil on canvas, 21 1/4 x 28 3/4″ (54 x 73 cm), Deposited with the Magritte Museum, Brussels.

Now on view at the MoMA.